Books

Part-Time Gods Book Review

I really enjoyed Minimum Wage Magic, so hopped right on over to listening to the audio book of Part-Time Gods.  Is it as good as its predecessor?  Yup!  Rachel Aaron knocks it out of the park with this sequel to the story.  She does a good job of keeping this story wrapped in its interpersonal relationships, while still having a bigger picture in play with the plot.  I think Aaron does a fantastic job of showing us the multiple sides of the story in this one.  As much as I like the Heartstrikers series, there was a clear divide of who was in the right, and who was in the wrong.  Julius just had to show them there was a different way of doing things and problem solved.  But in the DFZ series, you see both sides of this problem:  I found myself agreeing with Opal’s view point, and her Mother and Fathers.  Both have valid feelings, and both have the same problems of not wanting to listen to either side.  Eventually, they’re going to have to talk it out and come to an understanding with each other.  I think it’s a really great way to show the differing lives of people who would be living in the DFZ, and the cameos we got in this book from the Heartstrikers series were great, and added to the story, didn’t feel shoehorned in at all.

 

The plot ramps up hardcore in this book, and I marathonned the 2nd half of the book in one sitting.  Like it was that good: I was on the edge of my seat, waiting to see what happened next.  I read some people saying the end of the book was a cliffhanger, but I didn’t find that to be the case.  The book had a conclusive ending, but at the same time the book was leading to a bigger plot that is going to be concluded in the final book.

 

Everything came to a head in this book, and Aaron’s previous problem of filling the book with too much exposition for world building seems to have been curved overall.  It may help that the world of the DFZ is pre-established, but either way it’s refreshing to read a concisely written story.  The last 2 books of the Heartstrikers series were a bit wordy for me, so this is a really nice change.  It’s just a fast paced, super enjoyable read, that continues right where Minimum Wage Magic leaves off, so you’ll want to read that first before jumping into this one.

 

But yeah, needless to say, I super enjoyed this book.  I regret reading them both now only because I have to wait for the third book to be released, and I’m bursting at the seams!  I can’t wait to see what happens in the final installment of the DFZ books, and what will happen to Opal!

 

 

I’m mostly excited to see how Opal and her Dad will make a mends.  Like we saw some super interesting dynamics between the two – Opal is more like her Dad than she’d like to admit – and I really can’t wait to see more of their relationship in the next book.  I also really hope we see what happens between Nick and Opal (get together please) and all in all, seeing every relationships final conclusion is something I’m thoroughly looking forward to when the third book is released.

 

The DFZ is a great series, and a wonderful extension of the Heartstrikers universe.  I really hope Aaron writes more in this universe, because she has such a good grasp of it and seems to super enjoy it.  I know I do!
I’d like to end this review praising the audio book narrator, Emily Woo Zeller.  She does such a great job voicing Opal, and all of the other characters in this book that it gets me even more invested in the story even more than just reading would have.  I do miss the previous narrator when old characters from the Heartstrikers series pop up, but that’s really just my preference because it took me a while to pick this one up because I loved the narrator for the Heartstrikers books so much.  Getting over that though, and having time away from those books, she really does an excellent job capturing the grittiness of the DFZ, and all the different facets of Opal’s character.  I’d highly recommend picking up the audio books, you won’t regret it!
Have you read Part-Time Gods?  Let me know what you thought in the comments!

Books

Minimum Wage Magic [DFZ, Book 1] Review

I have this on again off again relationship with reading.  It’s not that I don’t like it, I love it in fact.  It’s just so hard to sift through good series and books for me, and only using Audible for books can get expensive.  Luckily, I found out the Kindle Reader PC app was accessible, so here’s to hoping I read more, but still when I find an author I like I’m super loyal and read all of their books.

 

That author lately is Rachel Aaron for me.  I read her Heartstrikers series and fell in love with it:  the world, characters, and writing are all so great.  I’m not normally into urban fantasy, but this one just clicks with my tastes so much that I read the entire thing and am a big fan of the universe it takes place in.  So when I heard that a new series of books was going to take place in the world of the DFZ, I was all in.
Recently, I decided to cancel my Audible subscription just for lack of using it, so with my two remaining credits, I picked up the first 2 books in the DFZ series.  How do they compare to the Heartstrikers series?

 

That’s kind of hard to say.  They’re two completely different styles of books, and I think that was a smart move on Aaron’s part.  I like both, for different reasons, but as far as my personal preference, I like Minimum Wage Magic more.  As much as I like the Heartstrikers series, it eventually evolved into this end of the world scenario.  I like it when stories are more personal, and Minimum Wage Magic is just that.  We follow Opal, a Cleaner in the DFZ – aka, someone who buys storage units, and takes what she gets out of the units and sells them.  We find out early on that she has a big debt to pay to someone by the end of the week, and the plot only thickens when the unit she buys has a dead body inside of it.  Said unit has notes that lead her on a crazy adventure with fellow cleaner Nick, and I don’t want to say anything else because the fun of this book is not knowing what will happen next.
It has a very heist setup to it – beat another party to the prize at the end of the adventure.  There’s plenty of action, lot of flare, and most importantly, the characters we follow are really fun and interesting.  Unlike Heartstrikers, we aren’t following someone who doesn’t want to fight.  That also lends itself to making this series stand on its own, and not making it feel like a rehashed story – and, there are plenty of cameos from characters from the first series of books.  If you haven’t read the Heartstrikers series, it won’t throw you off at all, but for those of us who have it’s a really nice nod to the series and there are really fun references in here.

 

 

But as I was saying, the characters are really interesting.  Both Opal and Nick are super dynamic, both together and apart and I’m seriously hoping they’ll get together at the end of all of this because they just complement each other so well.  The book is told in first person, from Opal’s POV and it just…works.  Like it doesn’t feel like we’re getting too much into her headspace because she’s a closed off character, but we learn just enough about her and her personality to like her, and she tells us enough about the world around her to know how the world works.  Her interactions with other characters don’t feel like first person, and the dialogue has Aaron’s typical mix of humor and grounded logic that I’ve come to really enjoy.

 

And that’s the biggest thing I have to say about this book:  It’s a lot more grounded than the Heartstrikers series.  Instead of world threatening odds, we’re dealing with one woman and her life.  It’s far more personal, and throughout the story that totally gets across.  It’s a super fun heist story with a grounded sense of self, while still having magic and technology that totally makes sense in the continuity of the world.  All the characters feel real, and I’m rooting for Nick and Opal to make it in the crazy world of the DFZ together throughout the rest of this series.

 

I’m super interested after this first entry in the series, to see how Opal and Nick’s stories will end.  Aaron once again, knocked it out of the park with this one.

 

If you’ve read the Heartstrikers series, or if you haven’t, Minimum Wage Magic is worth the read.  I’m going to be starting the 2nd book in the series asap, and can’t wait to see what happens next in Opal’s story.
Have you read Minimum Wage Magic?  Let me know how you liked it in the comments!

Cartoons

She-Ra and the Princesses of Power Season 4 Review [Spoiler Free]

We interrupt our regularly scheduled posting to gush about She-ra season 4.  But seriously, I didn’t want to wait to talk about this season, and in the future if I find something is too exciting to wait to talk about on a scheduled posting day, a surprise post will pop up with me talking about something new.  So this is the first post like that I guess.  Going to stay as spoiler free as I possibly can in this one, because this season was just so fantastic that you really have to experience it   yourself.

 

Before I said season 3 was the season that totally got me invested in the show.  It wasn’t that seasons 1 and 2 were bad, they just had a few things I had some gripes with, and wasn’t as fleshed out as I would have liked them to be.  Season 3 took that, and started on the road to a good show – the foundations laid in the first 2 seasons were taking fruit, and there was a clear vision for the show that made it a really fun watch.
Season 4 advances the spectacular groundwork season 3 put forward.  We got so many great character beats, a number of really fantastic plots, new characters that made sense in the show…season 4 was just a really great package that kept me on the edge of my seat.  The first half of the season was “filler” – but really, every episode counted.  Even if the plot in the episode was more light hearted and fun, there was some sort of plot or character beat that advanced the plot and character arcs forward.  This was the first time I felt the entire season was evenly paced in She-ra, and you can tell that the writers really upped their game and have a clear goal in mind for what the end of the story is going to be.  No middle book syndrome in this show – it just was such a joy to watch this season progress, and I can’t wait to see what will happen in season 5.

 

The characters get pushed to their limits in this season as well, and it was interesting seeing where situations took them, and seeing how they’d react.  Neither plot nor characters were set aside to further one or the other – it was well balanced all around.  The multiple character arcs didn’t feel like we were neglecting anyone either, and it was nice to see more spotlight on the overall universe, and on the Princesses that weren’t part of the main cast.  That doesn’t mean the main cast was set aside either:  Adora, Bo, Glimmer, and Catra all have really strong character arcs in this, and are pushed to their limits.  What they’re willing to do to stop this war is super interesting, and honestly I could write entire articles alone on Glimmer’s story arc this season.  The writers weren’t afraid to take certain character tropes and subvert or push them, and because of that the writing in season 4 is stronger than ever.

 

Some new characters were brought in that I don’t want to spoil, but they are welcome additions and I can’t wait to see what will happen in season 5 with them.  It’s more and more apparent  that our heroes are going to have to make crazy decisions to end this war, and what decisions they make are more interesting to me than the over-arching plot.  The world building was super good in this season also, and we got a lot of questions answered about an ongoing plot in the show since season 1 that is a very satisfying conclusion to the mystery given to us in prior seasons.  It also leaves it open to “What are our characters going to do now?”.  It’s just, wow, so amazing, I enjoyed it so much.

 

I keep on thinking, well the theme song says “We’re gonna win in the end” but the more this series develops, the more I get worried that that may not be the case.  That’s such amazing story telling right there:  I don’t feel like anyone is safe in this show, and just because our heroes are the heroes, it doesn’t mean their choices are necessarily the right ones.  This show truly is showing us a war story here, full of morally gray situations and I can’t get enough of it.

 

If you haven’t started watching this series, do it.  I mean, you may want to wait for the end of the show since I think the next season may be the last one, but like this show has improved so so so much from season 1.  It’s a reboot worthy of praise and attention, so I’m doing that here.  Give She-ra a watch if you like character driven, action fantasy shows.  You won’t regret it!

Anime

Violet Evergarden Review [Minor Spoilers]

I had heard so much about this anime when it had first come out, that it was at the top of my list to watch when I started to get back into anime.  While the show wasn’t bad by any means, it definitely didn’t resonate with me like it did with others, and it has a lot more problems in it than I think people are willing to admit.
This review is going to be a general overview of my feelings about the show, because honestly I can’t really put how I feel about it into categories.

 

My biggest problem with Violet Evergarden, is how much it tries to hit the viewer emotionally.  It’s not that it just happens to be emotional while you’re watching, but that the show just feels like it’s trying so hard to elicit a certain reaction from you.  The plot itself is more on the melodramatic side in general, but sometimes you’re just like ok, I get what you’re going for here, can we move on?  The theming of the show is so hard hitting and heavy-handed that after about the halfway point of the show you’re just done with it.  You get what they’re going for, it’s fine, but you’re already halfway through the show so no way you’re going to drop it right?  It took me twice as long to finish this show simply for the format of the thing:  When violet was dealing with writing the letter of the week, and we saw different characters through her perspective, those episodes were super interesting and captivating to me.  It was a nice episodic setup that reminded me very much of Kino’s Journey, and it was really enjoyable to see Violet evolve because of these one off episodes.  Whenever we decided to not focus on Violet being a doll, and actually focused on her inner turmoil, and the obligatory war plot, was where the show lost me.

 

The overall plot of the show deals with a war.  We don’t get enough details about this war to really care, it’s more of a backdrop for the story.  But for some reason halfway through the show, we decide to ignore Violet’s journey and just…go to this war plot.  Like I get war is a major part of Violet’s backstory, and if it was fleshed out more that it was effecting her and that eventually she would have to deal with that I think it could have worked.  But what we really get is them mentioning it here and there, her backstory in flashback, and then this rather hastily done resolution so we can get back to what the show really wants to be talking about:  Learning how to feel emotions, and dealing with grief.  And although I said those more emotional episodes were heavy-handed at times, that is truly where the show shines and is most engaging.  So why throw in a subplot that only partially effects the characters?

 

This lack of focus is what makes the anime a bust for me.  If we had a different format, instead of letter of the week, then going into a bigger plot, it would have been a more cohesive show.  As it stands   it just feels like the show can’t decide what tone it wants to take, or what story it wants to tell and that’s where it falls flat.  I would have much preferred a letter of the week format that was more finely woven into the tapestry of the story, and then perhaps Violet writing letters would somehow lead to this war plot that would somehow get fleshed out.  Perhaps through Violet writing letters for some military?  Who knows, I just really enjoyed the letter of the week format, and would have preferred the entire show to be that way.

 
The characters are fine, the music and setting are gorgeous.  As much as I can take or leave Violet as a main character, her storyline and coming of age story starts and ends satisfactorily.  The English voice cast is amazing…like everything about this show is really well executed, and to that end is where it falls apart.  It’s just trying so hard to be so polished, so perfect, so emotionally moving  that although I liked about half of the episodes, after a certain point I thought any emotional beat was just being forced and overly dramatic.

 

I know a lot of people like this show, and that every anime isn’t for everyone.  On paper, I should like Violet Evergarden, but I’ve seen far better anime in this genre executed way better that actually moved me to tears because of its plot and characters, and not just because it was trying really really hard to.

 

I’m glad people can resonate with this show, and I’m sure plenty of people resonate with Violet and what she’s going through.  It just isn’t the show for me.

 

That review got a little rambly, sorry about that!  I guess I had more thoughts about this show than I realized, but it’s super frustrating to me to really want to like a show and it just not click with you.  Has that ever happened to you with an anime?
Have you seen Violet Evergarden?  I’d love to hear how you feel about it in the comments!

Video Games

Alt-Frequencies Review

Alt-Frequencies is one of those games that I really wanted to like.  The premise is super fascinating:  You’re continuously being sent back in a time loop that lasts for a few minutes.  Within that time loop, you can record messages from different radio stations, and send them to other stations to help get the word out about government conspiracies.  How successful you are at getting said message out is entirely up to how much you pay attention to the different stations, and the different characters’ lives while you try to break the loop with your puzzle solving skills.
At its core, Alt-Frequencies is a mystery puzzle game.  I played it on PC, but it originally was for mobile, so the concept was using the touch screen to record messages.  I believe this gameplay can still be done on PC, but the developers of Alt-Frequencies made the game accessible to blind players by making sure you can turn on a mode that only has you using your keyboard.  It also automatically uses your screen reader to read menus, and any non-narrated segments of the game.  This was a wonderful thing to find out and made me instantly buy the game, because we need to support indi developers that have accessibility at the forefront of their minds.  But with all of that aside, how does Alt-Frequencies stack up as a game?

 

GAMEPLAY

 

Like I said, the gameplay is rather simple.  You hit enter to record a message, the up arrow to send a message, the space bar to hear a message you recorded, and the left and right arrows to switch between radio stations.  When you hear something you think is noteworthy and want to send to another station, just record and toggle over to the station you want to send it to, hit up, and they’ll react in a way that clearly tells you whether or not you got the right message to the right person, or whether you need to try something else.  It’s decently easy to figure out what you need to be doing and who you need to take cues from in regards to the puzzles, but at the same time I had a bit of a hard time with some of the later puzzles because it wasn’t super clear who you needed to send what to.  I’m not sure if that’s just my lack of puzzle solving skills, but a teeny bit more direction in where to go would have been nice in the later segments of the game.

 

It would seem like the mechanics would get boring, but I thought for how simple they were they were well executed, and I found myself wanting to find out what was going to happen next in the story.  Speaking of story…

 

PLOT

 

The plot was interesting, but didn’t land it’s mark.  The game when you know what you’re doing lasts about 2 hours tops, and for as much as they were developing the political intrigue it needed more time to have the story be ended satisfactorily.  It felt like we had just gotten into the meat of it, and then it slammed the breaks and the story ended.  The ending itself is a bit obligatory too, and doesn’t really feel like what we were heading towards story wise is what was supposed to happen.  I enjoyed the game overall, but really wish there was more time dedicated to fleshing out the story.

 

CHARACTERS

 

The characters and the radio stations themselves are the saving grace of this game.  The voice cast was really good at portraying their roles, and making me interested in what was going on for each radio station.  We have a small college station, jerky talk radio show host with more depth to him, big talk show duo and a few others I don’t want to spoil.  But as you go through the time loops, you can toggle through each station and hear how it’s effecting each person.  Do they buy into the time loop stuff?  Should they be doing something about it?  All of these emotions and plot beats are very well executed by the characters, and that’s why the length of the game is a bit disappointing – I really wanted to see more of a plot grow with the cast we got, and although you do see what all of them were doing in the final chapter, I just wish we would have gotten maybe two or three more chapters so the plot came to a better conclusion than we got.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Alt-Frequencies was still enjoyable to play overall.  If you want a short game just to play to pass the time, I’d say pick it up and give it a go.  It’s only $7.99 USD on Steam and I think for that price, you definitely get your money’s worth.  Even though I wanted more from the game, I liked what we got from it at the same time if that makes sense.  A solid 5 out of 10 for me, not annoyed I played it, but nothing that I’m wanting to play again any time soon.

 

You can pick up Alt-Frequencies here.

Anime

Lost Song Review [Spoiler Free]

I was in the mood to watch a fantasy anime after watching a lot of the heavier shows out there (Evangelion, Angel Beats, stuff like that) and when I was scrolling on Netflix, Lost Song’s description was interesting to me.  A magic system based on song, and a girl who wants to fulfill her dream of singing at the Starsong festival?  Sounded like my type of fun, adventurous, entertainingly tropey kind of fair.  What I got instead was a show that started out that way, and ended up in an entirely different direction all together.  Did this show succeed in trope subversion?  Or did it’s plot twists just make it fall flat.
…It fell flat.  Pretty darn hard too.

 

For more, let’s get into the review!

 

STORY

 

The story in Lost song follows two main characters.  Finis, a songstress who has the power to use songs, which work like casting magic spells in this world, who is being used to make sure one kingdom wins obligatory fantasy war.  Rin, a country girl, who also has the power of song, and wants to work her way to getting to the capital so she can sing at the Starsong festival.  Eventually, these two paths converge, and that’s pretty much the plot without spoiling anything major.  I thought the first six episodes of  the show did a good job of showing us the world Finis and Rin live in, and the problems they both had to face.  The show honestly plays out like an RPG for Rin’s plot:  Find new party member, learn new spell, run from soldiers, rinse repeat.  What I found far more interesting was Finis’ story, and her love story with Henry and I wish we would have seen more of this throughout the first half of the show.

 

It turns out, that there is a reason revealed in the second half of the show, that explains why we didn’t see Rin and Finis meet sooner, and it’s honestly a pretty good plot twist that I wasn’t expecting to happen.  How the show handled this after the fact however, didn’t really land at all, because to figure out why it was a good plot twist, I had to look for final episode discussions to see people explaining what the heck was going on.

 

The second half of the series was a confused mess of the show dropping this plot point, trying to explain it to us, trying to make sure it really really made sense and that it wasn’t a convoluted  mess (spoiler, it was) and the final episode’s epilogue, while sweet to an extent, leaves more questions than answers.  Plus, it leaves a ton of plot holes that I’m still trying to figure out after watching.

 

A good plot twist can’t drive a show.  I think Lost Song was really hoping that it would work, and that making this different than the average fantasy show would make it stand out amongst its peers.  This plot twist does the opposite however, and just makes Lost Song confusing and forgettable.  It wasn’t a bad ride by any means, but the show left no lasting impression on me and as of now the biggest thing I can say about it is “It was fine’.”

 

CHARACTERS

 

The characters were your average fantasy tropes.  The valiant  knight, the sad damsel who can’t lift a finger to protect herself, the country girl with big dreams and a heart of gold…I’m fine with a story either being plot driven or character driven, and this story obviously was going for an impactful plot, but the black and white nature of the characters was a bit heavy handed at times.  The bad guys were 100% evil and got theirs, the good guys won the day, and the main characters fate is…a bit murky?  Honestly I can’t talk enough about how wonky the plot twist made the show.  The ending for a certain set of characters is really unclear, and I highly doubt that we’ll get any content telling us how their fate ended up ending up, for lack of a better term.  If the plot stuck it’s landing and was executed well this wouldn’t bother me too much, but since the second half of the series went off the rails, it just was more obvious that the characters weren’t really fleshed out.

 

ACCESSIBILITY

 

You can pretty much tell what’s going on at any given time in the show.  It’s a very what you see is what you get type of series, so other than there being sections where music is playing only and not knowing what’s happening, and one episode that has narration and visuals (but that whole episode is a confusing mess so I doubt watching it would have really helped), the show is clear to follow beginning to end.  No audio description for this one, but there is an English dub that is probably the best part of the show for me.  That and the music, the music is fantastic.

 

CONCLUSION

 

The best way I can describe this show is Ar Tonelico:  The anime.  It honestly hit a lot of the story beats as that game did, but the game spent more time fleshing out the world and characters so it worked way better.  If Lost Song was a 24 episode anime, or even 18, then maybe it could have done service to the story it was trying to tell.  As it stands at 12 episodes, the second half of the story feels jarring, rushed, and that our characters just had to go with it so the show could end.  I won’t say it was a bad show, but it wasn’t a good one and it could have been if the plot twist wasn’t just thrown in there to make the show more interesting.

 

I’d give Lost Song a solid 6 out of 10, and that extra number is for how epic the music is.  It’s really a 5 out of 10:  I don’t feel annoyed I watched it, but it didn’t leave any lasting impression on me.  If you want a nice show to pass the time with and aren’t expecting too much, then go ahead and give this one a watch.  The plot twist genuinely shocked me and was a really good concept, I just wish it was executed better than it was.

 

Have you watched Lost Song?  Let me know what you thought of it in the comments!

 

Anime

Hi Score Girl Review

Netflix has a lot of anime guys.

 

Random statement to start a post off with, I know, but I didn’t realize how much anime there was on Netflix until I just decided to scroll down the page after watching something.  It’s crazy!  Like pretty much anything I’d want to watch is on here, pretty fantastic.  That’s pretty much what got me into watching anime again, if I’m being honest.  I tried getting on Funimation’s site to watch stuff, the site’s interface was too clunky for me to care, and the same goes for Crunchyroll.  I get not realizing blind people would want to watch anime (I don’t really but I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt) but at least have your sites comply to the web accessibility it should and have some headings on there so your site isn’t a pain to navigate, geez!
But that’s a digression for another post.  Netflix has a lot of anime, it’s accessible, and that means I’m all over it~

 

So what was the first anime I decided to watch, you say?  Why, the topic of this blog post!  After reading the premise of Hi Score Girl, it instantly made me interested.  A romance that takes place around all of my favorite things, retro gaming and the 90s?  I’m all in!  But how does this show hold up in the end?  Let’s jump into this review and see!

 

I’ve decided to split my anime reviews into sections.  Headings are my brains best friend, and the best way I can write my thoughts down.  The three things I’ll be reviewing anime on is story, characters, and accessibility of the show.  What is that last category?  Well since I can’t review visuals, instead I’ve turned that section into Accessibility.  Things like how easy is the show to follow?  Does it have audio description?  So basically visuals, but from a blind point of view.

 

Now for   real, let’s get into this!

 

STORY

 

The story of Hi Score Girl is pretty simple at it’s base.  Haruo is a gamer, one of those crazily obsessed, kinda jerky gamers and Ono is the rich girl in school that is aloof, but surprise surprise also into gaming!  She escapes her daily struggles by venturing into the arcades, and is like, top tier amazing and Haruo can have none of that so is a jerk to her until they slowly grow a bond throughout the series, that of course leads to love.

 

The story is basic, but the plot beats are not.  This story takes place over a series of years, from their elementary days to high school and seeing the slow burn of their romance is just really sweet and charming.  The pacing never feels out of place, and seeing the story be related through the lens of the gaming boom in the 90s and early 2000s is really relatable if you grew up in that era.  It’s super nostalgic  hearing the characters talking about Final Fantasy IV, VI, and Chrono Trigger being released, being so happy that amazing voice acting is getting into games, and the running joke of the oh-so-many Streetfighter 2 ports.  That basically is the backdrop for the love story, and it works really well because both blend together perfectly, simply because both characters are into gaming, and the writing for both the accurate gamer depiction and the characters themselves just give the show and it’s characters really good chemistry.

 

CHARACTERS

 

The characters are really well written.  As much as I think Haruo at times lends a little too much to the jerky gamer guy trope, it doesn’t detract from his character because we see throughout the story what lies underneath.  Ono is silent the entire show, but she is so expressive with her actions that it really doesn’t feel like it.  Koharu, although I was a tad annoyed a love triangle got into this show, is also a really well realized character and you feel for her also, and the way they do the love triangle trope subverts the trope quite nicely I think.

 

The supporting characters are really great as well.  Haruo’s Mom is the best, we need more single Mom’s in shows!  She’s just so much fun, and anytime she was on screen I enjoyed her being there.  There’s a really fun aspect of the show I don’t want to spoil if you haven’t watched it, that I’d count as supporting characters and adds a lot to the gaming aspect of the show that makes it feel like this is someone’s life we’re looking at, and it isn’t just a show.  Haruo’s school friends, Ono’s supporting cast…all just great additions to the show, and if I talked about them all individually we’d be here all day.  Characters are great, long story short lol.

 

ACCESSIBILITY

 

 

Netflix usually doesn’t have audio description for anime.  It’s one of those mysteries I’ll always wonder, “WHY?”.  But for Hi Score Girl, I was pleasantly surprised to see that it had audio description for the episodes, maybe because they’re counting it as a Netflix Original?  Anyway, it helps the show so much.  Like I said earlier, Ono is silent the entire way through other than grunts and expressions, so having the audio description say what she was doing just added so much to the smaller moments in the series.  Having the narrator say what she was doing at any given point in time made her my favorite character, and I don’t think that would have happened if audio description wasn’t there.  I really hope Netflix continues to do this for anime, I think there’s a stigma on it where it would detract from the show but it definitely doesn’t and I mean…you can turn it off if you don’t like it XD


The rest of the show it was nice to have for sure.  It wasn’t intrusive on any of the scenes like it sometimes can be when there’s major action or something, they didn’t duck the audio for the show too much when they had to.  It really just added to the experience and I don’t think the show would have been as fun to watch without it.

 

CONCLUSION

 

If you couldn’t tell, I really enjoyed watching this show.  It’s full of sweet moments, humor, and gaming, and all of it meshes together to make a very fun slice of life anime.  I can’t wait to see what happens in season 2!

 

Have you watched Hi Score Girl?  Let me know what you thought in the comments!